325 mesh | 3D Design | 3D Printer | 3D Slicer | 3D-Printed Clay | 3D-Printing | Abrasion Ceramics | Acidic Oxides | Agglomeration | Alkali | Alkaline Earths | Amorphous | Apparent porosity | Ball milling | Bamboo Glaze | Base Glaze | Base-Coat Dipping Glaze | Basic Oxides | Batch Recipe | Bisque | Bit Image | Black Coring | Bleeding colors | Blisters | Bloating | Blunging | Bone China | Borate | Boron Blue | Boron Frit | Borosilicate | Breaking Glaze | Brushing Glaze | Buff stoneware | Calcination | Calculated Thermal Expansion | Candling | Carbon Burnout | Carbon trap glazes | CAS Numbers | Casting-Jiggering | Celadon Glaze | Ceramic | Ceramic Binder | Ceramic Decals | Ceramic Glaze | Ceramic Ink | Ceramic Material | Ceramic Oxide | Ceramic Slip | Ceramic Stain | Ceramic Tile | Ceramics | Characterization | Chemical Analysis | Chromaticity | Clay | Clay body | Clay Body Porosity | Clay Stiffness | Co-efficient of Thermal Expansion | Code Numbering | Coil pottery | Colloid | Colorant | Cone 1 | Cone plaque | Cones | Copper Red | Cordierite Ceramics | Crackle glaze | Crawling | Crazing | Cristobalite | Cristobalite Inversion | Crucible | Crystalline glazes | Crystallization | Cuerda Seca | Cutlery Marking | De-Airing Pugmill | Decomposition | Deflocculation | Deoxylidration | Digitalfire Foresight | Digitalfire Insight | Digitalfire Reference Library | Dimpled glaze | Dip Glazing | Dipping Glaze | Dishwasher Safe | Dolomite Matte | Drop-and-Soak Firing | Drying Crack | Drying Performance | Drying Shrinkage | Dunting | Dust Pressing | Earthenware | Efflorescence | Encapsulated Stains | Engobe | Eutectic | Fast Fire Glazes | Fat Glaze | Feldspar Glazes | Firebrick | Fireclay | Fired Strength | Firing Schedule | Firing Shrinkage | Flameware | Flashing | Flocculation | Fluid Melt Glazes | Flux | Food Safe | Foot Ring | Forming Method | Formula Ratios | Formula Weight | Frit | Fritware | Functional | GHS Safety Data Sheets | Glass vs. Crystalline | Glass-Ceramic Glazes | Glaze Bubbles | Glaze Chemistry | Glaze Compression | Glaze Durability | Glaze fit | Glaze Gelling | Glaze Layering | Glaze Mixing | Glaze Recipes | Glaze Shrinkage | Glaze thickness | Globally Harmonized Data Sheets | Glossy Glaze | Green Strength | Grog | Gunmetal glaze | Handles | High Temperature Glaze | Hot Pressing | Incised decoration | Ink Jet Printing | Inside-only Glazing | Insight-Live | Interface | Iron Red Glaze | Jasper Ware | Jiggering | Kaki | Kiln Controller | Kiln Firing | Kiln fumes | Kiln venting system | Kiln Wash | Kovar Metal | Laminations | Leaching | Lead in Ceramic Glazes | Leather hard | Lime Popping | Limit Formula | Limit Recipe | Liner Glaze | LOI | Low Temperature Glaze Recipes | Lustre Colors | Majolica | Marbling | Material Substitution | Matte Glaze | Maturity | Maximum Density | MDT | Mechanism | Medalta Potteries, Medalta Stoneware | Medium Temperature Glaze | Melt Fluidity | Melting Temperature | Metallic Glazes | Micro Organisms | Microwave Safe | Mineralogy | Mocha glazes | Mohs Hardness | Mole% | Monocottura | Mosaic Tile | Mottled | Mullite Crystals | Native Clay | Non Oxide Ceramics | Oil-spot glaze | Once fire glazing | Opacifier | Opacity | Ovenware | Overglaze | Oxidation Firing | Oxide Formula | Oxide Interaction | Oxide System | Particle orientation | Particle Size Distribution | PCE | Permeability | Phase change | Phase Diagram | Phase Separation | Physical Testing | Pinholing | Plainsman Clays | Plaster Bat | Plaster table | Plasticine | Plasticity | Plucking | Porcelain | Porcelaineous Stoneware | Pour Glazing | Precipitation | Primary Clay | Primitive Firing | Production Setup | Propane | Propeller Mixer | Pyroceramics | Pyroceramics | Quartz Inversion | Raku | Reactive Glazes | Reduction Firing | Reduction Speckle | Refiring Ceramics | Refractory | Refractory Ceramic Coatings | Representative Sample | Respirable Crystalline Silica | Rheology | Rutile Glaze | Salt firing | Sanitary ware | Sculpture | Secondary Clay | Shino Glazes | Shivering | | Silica:Alumina Ratio (SiO2:Al2O3) | Silk screen printing | Sintering | Slaking | Slip Casting | Slip Trailing | Soaking | Soluble colors | Soluble Salts | Specific gravity | Splitting | Spray Glazing | Stain Medium | Stoneware | Stull Chart | Sulfate Scum | Sulfates | Surface Area | Surface Tension | Suspension | Tapper Clay | Tenmoku | Terra cotta | Terra Sigilatta | Test Kiln | Theoretical Material | Thermal Conductivity | Thermal shock | Thermocouple | Thixotropy | Tony Hansen | Toxicity | Tranlucency | Translucency | Transparent Glazes | Triaxial Glaze Blending | Ultimate Particles | Underglaze | Unity Formula | Upwork | Viscosity | Vitreous | Vitrification | Volatiles | Warping | Water in Ceramics | Water Smoking | Water Solubility | Wedging | Whiteware | Wood Ash Glaze | Wood Firing | Zero3 | Zeta Potential

Sieve

Sieves are important in ceramics for removing particulates and agglomerates from glaze, engobe and body slurries.

Details

Sieves are usually made from bronze or stainless steel wires. They are available in varying degrees of fineness and sizes are quoted according to the size of the opening or in wires per inch. Sieves used by potters usually have plastic or wooden frames whereas those used in labs are made from stainless steel or brass. Common sieves are available to 325 mesh (wires per inch). Wires become too fine to see somewhere beyond 100 mesh.

A 40-60 mesh sieve is normally used to screen earthenware and stoneware glazes and engobes (80-200 mesh for porcelain) to make sure they have no coarse particles or agglomerates that could mar the fired surface.

Screens are also used in the production of raw materials and prepared bodies, glazes and engobes. They often have rectangular openings that follow material flow. Powders can be screened using vibrating equipment, but this is not normally practical beyond 80 mesh.

Slurries pass through sieves better when they have a higher water content and are not gelled.

Related Information

Here is what happens if you do not sieve your glazes when needed

This is a cone 6 transparent base glaze. It contains frit, silica, kaolin, wollastonite. Almost all glazes have materials that are slightly soluble and over time these can form scale on the sides of the bucket or even precipitate particles into the slurry. The defects here are those scales. Before dipping a production piece in any glaze that has been in storage it is a good idea to assess it first to see if it needs to be sieved.

What can happen when a glaze slurry is not sieved before use

This glaze has just been applied to a bisqued tile. It contains wollastonite, which can agglomerate in storage. The white wollastonite lumps can be broken down by sieving the slurry through 80 mesh or finer. Many other materials behave in a similar manner (e.g. barium carbonate, iron oxide, cobalt oxide, clays, tin oxide, zircon).

This is what labs use to measure particle size

Two example of high quality brass laboratory sieves

To measure particle size in a slurry or powder you need sieves. This is the most popular type used in labs. They are made from brass by a company named Tyler. The range of screen sizes for testing particle size is very wide (obvious here: the top screen has an opening of 56 mm, the bottom one 0.1 mm - the wires are almost too small to see). You can buy these on ebay for a lot less than new ones, search for "tyler sieve". The finer sieves (especially 200) are fragile and easily ripped. It is good to have a 50, 100 and 150.

A root-of-two series of test sieves

The coarsest screen is at the top, the finest on the bottom. The opening for each is shown on the label. They are chosen such that each successive screen going down has an opening that is about half the area of the one above it. Using this series you can produce a practical measurement of the distribution of particle sizes in ceramic materials and bodies used in traditional ceramics (structural products industries, like brick, measure coarser particles than this, starting at perhaps 10 mesh and ending at 70). The 325 screen on the bottom is only used sometimes, it is difficult to finer-that-325 particles to pass through it because it blinds. It is not possible to shake powder through sieves that are this fine, samples must be washed through. We use the SIEV test to log results.

Going to screen a glaze? Use the brush, not the spatula

Do you need to rescreen a glaze slurry. Using a brush like this you will be able to get it through the screen much faster. This is because the rubber edge forces particles into the screen openings, plugging them. The brush is gentler, the oversize material just rolls around on top. If you are screening a glaze for the first time, however, the spatula is better if there are agglomerated particles that need to be broken up (e.g. wollastonite, cornwall stone). When rescreening, any oversize particles (e.g. precipitates) should be discarded.

Precipitate can forms in fritted glazes, remember to screen it

Potters often store glazes for long periods so tiny spherical precipitate particles can form. These were found in a months-old bucket of G2926B (M370 clear) cone 6 clear glaze (about 2 gallons). These can appear over time, depending on factors like temperature, electrolytes in your water or solubility in the materials (likely, the frit is slightly soluble). The glaze slurry should be screened periodically (or immediately if you note the particles when glazing a piece). This is an 80 mesh screen. Note the brush, using one of these gets the glaze through the screen much quicker than using a rubber spatula.

How small can clay crystals be?

Table salt crystals on a 60 mesh screen. It has an opening of 250 micro meters (these are the half of the crystals that passed this size). Notice on the right, several crystals are in the openings, about to fall through. Imagine that bentonite or ball clay crystals can be 0.1 um in diameter, that is 2500 times smaller on a side. That would be 2500x2500 on a layer the size of a salt crystal and the thickness of a clay crystal. Since the clay crystal is much thinner than wide, perhaps ten could stack to the same dimension. That means theoretically 2500x2500x25000 could pack into a grain of salt!

325 mesh

A closeup of a 325 mesh screen

A 325 screen has 325 wires-per-inch (the finer of the two screen closeups shown here). Those are grains of salt on it (45 micron openings, a typical human hair is 60 microns wide). A 40 mesh screen is much coarser, it has 425 micron openings (that is a particle of quartz trapped in an opening). A minus 45 mesh powder will be too fluffy to drop through a 325 screen. But particles smaller than 45 microns in a slurry will pass. To get a slurry through a screen this fine one needs to take special measures. I needs to have a high water content so it is fluid. Using a soft brush definitely helps. And a source of vibration. And it is necessary to clean the screen often to remove trapped oversize material. 325 mesh screen fabric is fragile and a sieve like this needs to be treated with care. These cost hundreds of dollars.

Links

URLs http://www.kason.com/mesh.php
US Sieve conversion chart (mesh, microns)
URLs https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0zXfghDNxUg
ShowerShelf.com home-made vibratory screen can handle 1.8SG slurry
Tests Wet Sieve Residue
Tests Sieve Analysis 35-325 Wet
Tests Sieve Analysis Wet
Tests Sieve Analysis Dry

By Tony Hansen


Copyright 2008, 2015, 2017 https://digitalfire.com, All Rights Reserved