04DSDH - Cone 04 Drop-and-Hold
BQ1000 - Plainsman Electric Bisque Firing Schedule
C04PLTP - Plainsman Typical Cone 04
C10RPL - Plainsman Cone 10R Firing

C6MSGL1 - Mastering Glazes Cone 6
C6PLST - Plainsman Cone 6 Electric Standard
FSCG1 - Shimbo Crystal Schedule 1
FSCGB1 - Bory 1 Fara Shimbo Crystalline Glaze
FSCGCL - Celestite
FSCGWM - Wollast-O-Matte Fara Shimbo Crystalline Glaze
FSCRGL - GC106 Base for Crystalline Glazes
FSHP1 - Shimbo Crystal Holding Pattern 1
FSHP2 - Shimbo Crystal Holding Pattern 2
FSHP3 - Shimbo Crystal Holding Pattern 3
FSNM5 - Fa's Number Five
PLC6CR - Cone 6 Crystal Glaze Plainsman
PLC6DS - Cone 6 Drop-and-Soak Firing Schedule

C6DHSC Firing Schedule

Plainsman Cone 6 Slow Cool (Reactive glazes)

We first started using this schedule to develop the bright blue coloration of rutile glazes (e.g. GA6-C). However, we found that this also improves the most glossy glazes, producing a better defect free surface (e.g. GA6-A, GA6-B). This is also good for getting maximum matteness in glazes (since time is needed for the micro-crystals to grow).

THIS SCHEDULE CAN MAKE MATTE GLAZES TOO MATTE. They may need to cool more quickly to be silky (e.g. G2934). Please see the notes for the cone 6 drop-and-soak firing for more detail (it is the same as this but without step 5).

You must program your firing manually, there is no built-in schedule even remotely similar to this. Include a self-supporting cone 6 frequently in firings to monitor the accuracy of your controller. Adjust the temperature of step 3 to correspond to where the tip of cone 6 falls even with the top of the base (see picture below).

Step °C °F Hold Time
1 60°C/hr to 104C  108°F/hr to 220F  60min 2:20 Longer soak if ware is heavy or thick
2 194°C/hr to 1148C  350°F/hr to 2100F  15min 7:57 Climb faster if ware is thin
3 60°C/hr to 1204C  108°F/hr to 2200F  15min 9:08 Slower climb if ware is thick, keep soak here short if possible
4 500°C/hr to 1148C  900°F/hr to 2100F  30min 9:45 Drop quickly
5 83°C/hr to 760C  150°F/hr to 1400F    14:25 Slow cool to 1400F
Start temperature assumed: 25°C or 75°F

Related Information

Same glaze/body. One fired flawless, the other dimpled, pinholes. Why?

The difference is a slow-cool firing. Both mugs are Plainsman M340 and have a black engobe inside and partway down on the outside. Both were dip-glazed with the GA6-B amber transparent and fired to cone 6. The one on the right was fired using the PLC6DS drop-and-hold schedule. That eliminated any blisters, but some pinholes remained. The one on the left was fired using the C6DHSC slow-cool schedule. That differs in one way: It cools at 150F/hr from 2100F to 1400F (as opposed to a free-fall). It is amazing how much this improves the brilliance and surface quality (not fully indicated by this photo, the mug on the left is much better).

The matteness of this glaze depends on the cooling rate

This is the G2934Y matte cone 6 recipe with a red stain (Mason 6021). The one on the left was fired using the C6DHSC slow-cool schedule. The one on the right was fired using the drop-and-soak PLC6DS schedule. The only difference in the two schedules is what happens after 2100F on the way down (the slow-cool drops at 150F/hr and the other free-falls). For this glaze, the fast cool is much better, producing a silky pleasant surface rather than a dry matte.

What position should the cone be for correct firing?

Two orton cones, one bent to 6 oclock, the other 4 oclock.

Four o'clock. These are self-supporting cones, use these. I was consistently getting the cone on the left using a custom-programmed firing schedule to 2204F (for cone 6 with ten minute hold). However Orton recommends that the tip of the self supporting cone should be even with the top of the base, not the bottom. So I adjusted the program to finish at 2200F and got the cone on the right. But note: This applies to that kiln with that pyrometer, our other test kiln puts cone 6 at 4 o'clock at 2195F. Of course, if you want the kiln to hold at cone 6 for longer the cone will bend further, so the top temperature would need to be reduced to compensate for that. If you are using the automatic programs (e.g. cone 6 schedules go to around 2230!) your kiln is almost certainly over firing.

P300 and M370 mugs with GA6A Alberta Slip (using Frit 3249)

Rather than the normal 80:20 AlbertaSlip:Frit3134 recipe, this one substitutes Frit 3249 (super low expansion). The glaze is less runny and even glossier on these Plainsman porcelains. They are fired at cone 6 in a cool-and-soak firing. They survived an BWIW test (boiling water:ice water) without crazing (likely because of the low expansion of frit 3249). The finish is dazzling, a brilliant amber glass with no defects and perfectly even coverage. Of course, the iron in the glass prevents the colors of the blue underglaze from showing through. But the black is great.

GA6A Alberta Slip base using Frit 3124, 3249 and 3195 on dark body

The body is dark brown burning Plainsman M390 (cone 6). The amber colored glaze is 80% Alberta Slip (raw:calcine mix) with 20% of each frit. The white engobe on the inside of two of the mugs is L3954A (those mugs are glazed inside using transparent G2926B). The Alberta Slip amber gloss glaze produces an ultra-gloss surface of high quality on mugs 2 and 3 (Frit 3249 and 3195). On the outside we see it this glaze on the white slip until midway down, then on the bare red clay. The amber glaze on the first mug (with Frit 3124) has a pebbly surface. These are fired using a drop-and-soak firing schedule. Some caution is required with the 3249 version, it has low thermal expansion (that is good on bodies that normally craze glazes, but risks shivering on ones that do not).

Alberta Slip GA6-A cone 6 base glaze slow cooled

GA6-A Alberta Slip base glaze (80 Alberta Slip:20 Frit 3134) fired with Plainsman slow cool cone 6 firing schedule on Plainsman M390 iron red clay. If this is cooled at normal speed, it fires to a glossy clear amber glass with no crystals.

Cone 6 rutile floating blue effect lost. Then regained.

Left: What GA6-C Alberta Slip rutile blue used to look like. Middle: When it started firing wrong, the color was almost completely lost. Right: The rutile effect is back with a vengeance! What was the problem? We were adjusting firing schedules over time to find ways to reduce pinholing in other glazes and bodies. Our focus was slowing the final stages of firing and soaking there. In those efforts the key firing phase that creates the effect was lost: it happens on the way down from cone 6. This glaze needs a drop-and-soak firing (e.g. cooling 270F from cone 6, soaking, then 150F/hr drop to 1400F).

Manually programming a Bartlett V6-CF hobby kiln controller

I document programs in my account at insight-live.com, then print them out and enter them into the controller. This controller can hold six, it calls them Users. The one I last edited is the one that runs when I press "Start". When I press the "Enter Program" button it asks which User: I key in "2" (for my cone 6 lab tests). It asks how many segments: I press Enter to accept the 3 (remember, I am editing the program). After that it asks questions about each step (rows 2, 3, 4): the Ramp "rA" (degrees F/hr), the Temperature to go to (°F) to and the Hold time in minutes (HLdx). In this program I am heating at 300F/hr to 240F and holding 60 minutes, then 400/hr to 2095 and holding zero minutes, then at 108/hr to 2195 and holding 10 minutes. The last step is to set a temperature where an alarm should start sounding (I set 9999 so it will never sound). When complete it reads "Idle". Then I press the "Start" button to begin. If I want to change it I press the "Stop" button. Those ten other buttons? Don't use them, automatic firing is not accurate. One more thing: If it is not responding to "Enter Program" press the Stop button first.

Links

Firing Schedules Plainsman Cone 6 Electric Standard
Used in the Plainsman lab to fire clay test bars in our small kilns
Firing Schedules Cone 6 Drop-and-Soak Firing Schedule
Recipes GA6-C - Alberta Slip Rutile Blue Cone 6
Plainsman Cone 6 Alberta Slip based glaze the fires bright blue but with zero cobalt.

By Tony Hansen


Tell Us How to Improve This Page

Version: Oct/2020

Or ask a question and we will alter this page to better answer it.

Email Address

Name

Subject

Message


Upload picture

Please check recaptcha to proceed


Copyright 2008, 2015, 2017 https://digitalfire.com, All Rights Reserved