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Albite | Allophane | Alunite | Amblygonite | Amorphous Silica | Anatase | Andalusite | Anorthite | Anorthosite | Aplite | Aragonite | Asbestos | Attapulgite, Palygorskite | Azurite | Baddeleyite | Ball Clay | Barytes, Barite | Bastnäsite | Bauxite | Berthierite | Beryl | Biotite | Boracite | Borate Minerals | Bornite | Brookite | Brucite | Calcite | Cassiterite | Celsian | Cerussite | Chalcedony | Chlorite | Chrysotile | Corundum | Dickite | | Fayalite | Feldspar | Galena | Gibbsite | Granite | Gypsum | Hübnerite | Halloysite | Hectorite | Hematite | Hydroboracite | Illite | Illmenite | Iron Pyrite | K-Feldspar | Kaolinite | Kernite | Kyanite | Laterite | Lepidolite | Leucite | Limestone | Limonite | Magnesite | Magnetite | Malachite | Manganite | Mica | Microcline, Anorthoclase | Monazite | Montmorillonite, Bentonite | Mullite | Muscovite | Na-Feldspar | Nacrite | Nepheline | Nontronite | Oligoclase | Olivine | Organics | Pegmatite | Phlogopite Mica | Plagioclase | Potash Mica | Pyrophyllite | Quartz | Quartzite | Rutile | Sanidine | Saponite | Selenite | Sepiolite | Sericite | Serpentine | Shale | Sillimanite | Slate | Smectite | Soda Mica | Sodalite | Sphalerite | Steatite | Stibnite | Sylvite | Talc | Tremolite | Trona | Vanadinite | Willemite | Witherite | Zeolite

Dolomite

Dolomite, as a rock, is called "dolomitic limestone". It is a carbonate, similar to limestone, but having the chemistry CaMg(CO3)2 (instead of CaCO3). Manufacturers blend materials in a controlled fashion to produce a consistent product having the ideal mix of calcium and magnesium carbonates to approximate the formula CaMg(CO3)2.

In ceramics, dolomite powders are the most inexpensive source of MgO and CaO for glazes and frits.

Related Information

Idea: Gather rocks and fire them. Unexpected results!

The riverbank and the rocks

I gathered these downstream from the Oldman River dam in southern Alberta. My ultimate goal is to paint on underglaze designs, possibly a clear glaze over that, then fire them to cone 6. The Oldman River exits the Rocky mountains nearby, so these billions of rocks are not far from their original source. Upper right: The rocks as I gathered them. Lower left: After firing to cone 04 (about 1900F). Lower right: After I poured water on them! Seven disintegrated in front of my eyes. With sound effects, even popping! Generating high heat and steam in the process. That means they are all limestone or dolostone. The firing drove off the carbonate. But the calcium sulphate wants it back and welcomes it with a fanfare. #5 and #10 cracked badly. The unfractured ones appear to be iron-bearing silt and sand stones, they should withstand considerably higher temperatures.

Links

Materials Dolomite
URLs http://www.mineralszone.com/minerals/dolomite.html
Dolomite at mineralszone.com
URLs http://www.handbookofmineralogy.org/pdfs/Dolomite.pdf
Dolomite mineral data
URLs https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dolomite_(rock)
Dolomite rock at Wikipedia
Minerals Limestone
Minerals Talc
Minerals Calcite
Oxides CaO - Calcium Oxide, Calcia

By Tony Hansen


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