Javascript must be enabled in the security or content
settings of your browser for this site to work properly

To learn more about cookies search for HTTP cookie at wikipedia.com





Click here for information about DIGITALFIRE Corporation

Home | Products | Support | Education 
About | Privacy | Search | Reference Database | Log in 


Conquer the Glaze Dragon With Digitalfire INSIGHT Glaze Chemistry Software

Install it on your PC

This software is focused on ceramic glaze chemistry calculations. Desktop Insight is an application that you download and install on Windows, Linux and Macintosh computers. It is powered by SQLite, the best cross platform database. An Insight-Live account is included free when you purchase Level 2.

Download: Windows (2014-8c), OSX (2014-8c), Linux (2014-8c)


Test, Document, Learn, Repeat in your account at insight-live.com

Use it online

Nothing to download or install. Document recipes, materials, testing, firing schedules, and more in your on-line account! Revolutionary! The future! This does the chemistry and the physics. It works on any browser-equipped tablet or smart-phone. And it is available for a low monthly rate (only 3-8 cents a day).


Tony Hansen's Thousand-Post TimeLine

I am the creator of Digitalfire Insight, Digitalfire.com and Insight-live.com. I have made hundreds of posts like these on my Facebook page and personal timeline. My posts are like no others, they help you understand your glazes and clay bodies, take control. They are also part of the Digitalfire Reference Database (referenced from one or more articles, glossary entries, materials, oxides, test procedures, etc). Visit and Like my page to get a notification each time I post. Search is coming soon.

Adding an opacifier can produce cutlery marking!

G2934 cone 6 matte (left) with 10% zircopax (center), 4% tin oxide (right). Although the cutlery marks clean off all of them, clearly the zircopax version has the worst problem and is the most difficult to clean. To make the best possible quality white it is wise to line blend in a glossy glaze to create a compromise between the most matteness possible yet a surface that does not mark or stain.

See it in context: G2934 - Plainsman Cone 6 Dolomite Matte Base, Opacifier, Opacification, Cutlery Marking

Wednesday 2nd April 2014

Now that is a translucent porcelain!

These are two cone 6 transparent glazed porcelain mugs with a light bulb inside. On the left is the porcelainous Plainsman M370 (Laguna BMix 6 would have similar opacity). Right is a zero-porosity New Zealand kaolin based porcelain called Polar Ice (from Plainsmanclays.com also)! The secret to making a plastic porcelain this white and translucent is not just the NZ kaolin, but the use of a very expensive plasticizer, VeeGum T, to enable maximizing the feldspar to get the fired maturity.

See it in context: Bone Ash, Formulating a Porcelain, New Zealand Halloysite, Bone China, Translucency

Friday 4th April 2014

Is this your record keeping system?

Keeping your valuable notes like this? Recipes? Test results? Are your pictures lost in a cellphone with no keywords or connections to anything? If you test and develop you need to do things a book cannot do. Like link recipes to each other and other things like pictures and firing schedules. You need to group test recipes in projects, classify them. Calculate chemistry and mix tickets. Research materials. Do keyword searches. Books and binders do not do this. Your account at Insight-live.com does!

See it in context: Insight-Live.com Overview Video

Saturday 20th September 2014

Grog before it is ground. Yes, it is bricks.

Pure grog (brick aggregate) is made by crushing bricks to produce a particulate material that is added to sculpture clay bodies to reduce their drying shrinkage (to reduce drying cracks) and impart texture. Brick manufacturers always have a certain percentage of reject and actually grind the reject bricks and clay together. These are structural high temperature stoneware bricks in a stockpile at Plainsman Clays.

See it in context: Grog

Monday 21st April 2014

Crazing after a year of use. What is the problem?

A cone 10R grey stoneware mug that has begun to craze on the inside. The greyer coloration around the craze lines indicates that water is soaking into the slightly porous body. This mug has lost the ring it had when it was new (it is only about a year old). It could be refired to be as good as new but would soon return to this condition. The only real solution is to reformulate this glaze to reduce its thermal expansion.

See it in context: COE, Co-efficient of Thermal Expansion, Dealing With Crazing, Crazing

Tuesday 25th February 2014

Tuning the degree of gloss on a matte black glaze

These 10 gram balls were fired and melted down onto a tile. The one the left is the original G2934 Plainsman Cone 6 MgO matte with 6% stain. On the right the adjustment has a 20% glossy glaze addition to make it a little less matte. Notice the increased flow (the ball has flattened more) with the addition of the glossy. In addition, while the percentage of stain is actually less (on the right), the color appears darker! Tuning the degree of matteness when making color additions to a base is almost always necessary to achieve a glaze that does not cutlery mark.

See it in context: G2934 - Plainsman Cone 6 Dolomite Matte Base, Cutlery Marking

Monday 21st July 2014

Mason stains in a cone 6 clear base

These are Mason stains added to cone 6 G2926B clear liner base glaze. Notice that the chrome tin maroon 6006 does not develop as well as the G2916F glossy base recipe. The 6020 manganese alumina pink is also not developing.

See it in context: Stains Mason, G2926B - Plainsman Cone 6 M370 Glossy Transparent Liner, G2916F - Plainsman Cone 6 M340 Glossy Transparent Liner, Colorant

Wednesday 9th April 2014

Mason stains in a cone 6 clear base

These are Mason stains added to cone 6 G2916F clear liner base glaze. Notice that all of these stains develop the correct colors with this base (except for manganese alumina pink 6020).

See it in context: G2916F - Plainsman Cone 6 M340 Glossy Transparent Liner, Stains Mason

Thursday 3rd April 2014

This glaze can dry on metal without cracking, even though it is thick!

This sample of glaze was dried under a heat lamp to measure its water content. If a glaze that is this thick can crack this little during drying and adhere even to stainless steel there is absolutely no reason you need to suffer glazes cracking during drying on bisque ware. This one is very high in frit with about 15% No. 5 ball clay. Drying cracking problems can be fixed using Digitalfire Insight, it enables you to juggle a recipe to reduce and substitute plastic ingredients while maintaining the chemistry.

See it in context: G2916F - Plainsman Cone 6 M340 Glossy Transparent Liner

Wednesday 2nd April 2014

Stonewares dry better than porcelains

The plastic porcelain has 6% drying shrinkage, the coarse stoneware has 7%. They dried side-by-side. The latter has no cracking, the former has some cracking on all handles or bases (the lower handle is completely separated from the base on this one). Why: The range of particle sizes in the stoneware impart green strength. The particles and pores also terminate micro-cracks.

See it in context: Drying Crack, Green Strength, Particle Size Distribution, Clay Shrinkage

Wednesday 9th April 2014


These posts are actually pictures referenced on pages in The Digitalfire Reference Database, thousands of pages of explaining things you need to know to formulate, adjust and troubleshoot traditional ceramic bodies and glazes. It is organized as: Oxides, minerals, materials, recipes, articles, glossary, hazards, library, MDTs for INSIGHT, pictures, properties, firing schedules, significant temperatures, tests and troubleshooting. Level 2 desktop INSIGHT and Insight-Live both interact with it.

Sign In or Register

Is your glaze problem related to it's chemistry? Ask Us!

Email address

Subject

Name

Message

Are people thinking about glaze toxicity?

  • I have large cobalt blue glasses in my kitchen. At night I leave water in one when I go to bed. I noticed a distinct metal taste in the water each morning. I tried putting water in an identical sized clear glass and noticed no metal taste after more than 24 hours. I repeated the experiment with different water(bottled). I got the same result. After 24 hours the cobalt glass reeks of metal taste. Can cobalt glass actually excrete cobalt into water?
Click here to see all 14

DigitalFire Logo

Suite 407, 1595 Southview Drive SE, Medicine Hat, AB T1B 0A1
Answering Machine: (406) 662-0136, FAX: (403) 527-7508
Privacy Policy

CCBot/2.0 (http://commoncrawl.org/faq/) (6)