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Alberta Slip 1900F Calcined

Alternate Names: Calcined Alberta Slip

Oxide Analysis Formula
CaO 6.60% 0.38
MgO 4.40% 0.35
K2O 3.90% 0.13
Na2O 2.50% 0.13
TiO2 0.30% 0.01
Al2O3 17.00% 0.54
SiO2 60.00% 3.23
Fe2O3 5.00% 0.10
P2O5 0.10% -
Oxide Weight 322.71
Formula Weight 322.71

Notes

The chemistry of this material is slightly different than for raw Alberta Slip (it does not lose any weight on firing, so it supplies more of each of the oxides to the fired glaze, 9% more). This chemistry provided here assumes complete calcination (to at least cone 04). However there is an issue. The page at albertaslip.com recommends roasting to only 1000F, at that temperature it looses only 3% weight on firing.

Another issue is particulates. When calcined at 1900F, particles sinter together into larger ones, requiring glaze ball milling. But at 1000F this does not occur.

Related Information

Roasting Alberta and Ravenscrag Slips at 1000F: Essential for good glazes

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Roasted Alberta Slip (right) and raw powder (left). These are thin-walled 5 inch cast bowls, each holds about 1 kg. I hold the kiln at 1000F for 30 minutes. Why do this? Because Alberta Slip is a clay, it shrinks on drying (if used raw the GA6-B and similar recipes will crack as they dry and then crawl during firing). Roasting eliminates that. Calcining to 1850F sinters some particles together (creating a gritty material) while roasting to 1000F produces a smooth, fluffy powder. Technically, Alberta Slip losses 3% of its weight on roasting so I should use 3% less than a recipe calls for. But I often just swap them gram-for-gram.

Something is definitely wrong the glaze thickness here!

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This is an example of how a glaze that contains too much plastic clay has been applied too thick. It shrinks and cracks during drying and is guaranteed to crawl. This is raw Alberta Slip. To solve this problem you need to tune a mix of raw and calcine material. Enough raw is needed to suspend the slurry and dry it to a hard surface, but enough calcine is needed to keep the shrinkage low enough that this cracking does not happen. The Alberta Slip website has a page about how to do the calcining.

Why does the glaze on the right crawl?

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This is G2415J Alberta Slip glaze on porcelain at cone 6. Why did the one on the right crawl? Left: thinnest application. Middle: thicker. Right thicker yet and crawling. All of these use a 50:50 calcine:raw mix of Alberta Slip in the recipe. While that appears fine for the two on the left, more calcine is needed to reduce shrinkage for the glaze on the right (perhaps 60:40 calcine:raw). This is a good demonstration of the need to adjust raw clay content for any glaze that tends to crack on drying. Albertaslip.com and Ravenscrag.com both have pages about how to calcine and calculate how much to use to tune the recipe to be perfect.

Will this crawl when fired? For sure!

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This high-Alberta-Slip glaze is shrinking too much on drying. Thus it is going to crawl during firing. This common issue happens because there is too much plastic clay in the glaze recipe (common with slip glazes). Clay is needed to suspend the other particles, but too much causes the excessive shrinkage. The easiest way to fix this is to use a mix of raw and calcined Alberta Slip (explained at albertaslip.com). The calcined Alberta Slip has no plasticity and thus much less shrinkage (but it still has the same chemistry). Many matte glazes have high kaolin contents and recipes will often contain both raw and calcined kaolin for the same reason.

Links

Materials Alberta Slip
Albany Slip successor - a plastic clay that melts to dark brown glossy at cone 10R, with a frit addition it can also host a wide range of glazes at cone 6.
Materials Alberta Slip 1000F Roasted
URLs http://albertaslip.com
AlbertaSlip.com
Troubles Glaze Crawling
Ask yourself the right questions to figure out the real cause of a glaze crawling issue. Deal with the problem, not the symptoms.
By Tony Hansen
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