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Antimony Oxide

Antimony compounds are toxic and dangerous. They can cause dermatitis, conjunctivitis, nasal-septum ulceration through direct contact or by inhalation of dust or fumes. Antimony oxide has caused lung tumors in laboratory inhalation studies. Antimony is also connected with kidney and liver degeneration, adverse reproductive effects.

ntimony compounds may be irritating to the mucous membrane of the respiratory system and to the eyes. In case of eye contact, wash out eyes thoroughly by means of a continuously flowing stream of water directed into the eyes for 10-15 minutes. Consult a physician. Use only in adequate ventilation or wear proper respiratory protection.

Antimony oxide is insoluble in common organic solvents, but very slightly soluble in water. Can be contaminated with arsenic.

Antimony has a TLV (threshold limit value) of 0.5 milligrams per cubic meter of air breathed. By comparison iron oxide is considered a safe-to-use material at 5.0, kaolin is 2.0, barium carbonate is 0.5, quartz is 0.1-0.05.

Related Information

Links

Materials Antimony Oxide
URLs http://www.ilo.org/public/english/protection/safework/cis/products/icsc/dtasht/_icsc07/icsc0775.htm
Antimony Hazards at ilo.org

By Tony Hansen


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