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50-250C (122-482F) | 80-250C (176-482F) | 120C (248F) | 150C (302F) | 180C (356F) | 185C (365F) | 200-450C (392-842F) | 200-1000C (392-1832F) | 200C (392F) | 210-280C (410-536F) | 250-370C (482-698F) | 260C (500F) | 290C (554F) | 300-330C (572-626F) | 300C (572F) | 370C (698F) | 370-950C (698-1742F) | 400-600C (752-1112F) | 400C (752F) | 425-650C (797-1202F) | 500-600C (932-1112F) | 512C (953F) | 535C (995F) | 540-600C (1004-1112F) | 650-900C (1202-1652F) | 750-1000C (1382-1832F) | 750-850C (1382-1562F) | 760C (1400F) | 760C (1400F) | 787C (1448F) | 800-1100C (1472-2012F) | 815C (1499F) | 815C (1499F) | 843C (1549F) | 850C (1562F) | 850C (1562F) | 850-950C (1562-1742F) | 870-900C (1598-1652F) | 871C (1599F) | 900C (1652F) | 900-1000C (1652-1832F) | 900C (1652F) | 926C (1698F) | 932C (1709F) | 954C (1749F) | 980C (1796F) | | 990C (1814F) | 1025C (1877F) | 1025-1325C (1877-2417F) | 1050C (1922F) | 1050C (1922F) | 1065-1120C (1949-2048F) | 1082C (1979F) | 1100C (2012F) | 1100C (2012F) | 1100C (2012F) | 1300C (2372F) | 1325C (2417F) | 1330C (2426F) | 1360C (2480F) | 1418-1428C (2584-2602F) | 1420C (2588F) | 1510C (2750F) | 1550C (2822F) | 1565C (2849F) | 1650C (3002F) | 1785C (3245F) | 1990C (3614F) | 2300C (4172F) | 2320C (4208F)

982C (1799F)

Comparison of frit melts at 1800F

Related Information

Frit Melt Fluidity Comparison - 1800F


Fired at 350F/hr to 1800F and held for 15 minutes (I already did firings from 1300F-1750F in 50 degree increments, all of them are visible in the parent project). Frit 3110, 3134, 3195, F75 have run all the way down. All of the frits have softened and melted slowly over a range of temperatures (hundreds of degrees). By contrast, Gerstley Borate, the only raw material here, suddenly melted and flowed right over the cliff (between 1600 and1650)! But not before Frit 3602 and FZ16 had done so earlier. Frit 3249 is just starting to soften but F69 (the Fusion Frits equivalent) is a little ahead of it. LA300 and Frit 3124 are starting also. F524, F38, F15 will all be over the end by the next firing. The melt surface tension is evident by the way in which the melts spread out or hold together.

By Tony Hansen
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