Monthly Tech-Tip from Tony Hansen SignUp

No tracking! No ads!That's why this page loads quickly!

| 80C-250C | 120C | 150C | 180C | 185C | 200C | 200C-1000C | 200C-450C | 210C-280C | 250C-370C | 260C | 290C | 300C-330C | 300C | 370-950C | 400C-600C | 400C | 425C-650C | 480C-600C | 500C-600C | 512C | 535C | 540C-600C | 650C-900C | 700F | 750C-1000C | 750-850 | 800C-1100C | 850-950 | 850C | 850C+ | 900-1000 | 900C | 990C | 1025-1325 | 1025C+ | 1050C | 1050C | 1082C | 1100C+ | 1100C | 1100C | 1300C | 1325C | 1330C | 1360C | 1400F | 1400F | 1418C-1428C | 1420C | 1500F | 1550C | 1565C | 1600F-1650F | 1650F | 1785C | 1800F | 1950F-2050F | 1990C | 2300C | 2320C | 2750F

50-250C

Hygroscopic water removed in clay bodies

Occurs during heat-up of bodies on first fire. All clay bodies contain some water not removed from the drying process. Heating greenware too fast through this range is the most common cause of cracking (ware can even explode if the water cannot escape fast enough through the pores). On the up-cycle, kilns are often held at around 120C. Even though this is beyond the boiling point of water, it has been proven practical and even necessary to remove most of the pore water before continuing with the firing.

Related Information

Links

Temperatures Dehydroxylation in clays (480C-600C)

By Tony Hansen


Tell Us How to Improve This Page

Or ask a question and we will alter this page to better answer it.

Email Address

Name

Subject

Message


CAPTCHA

Leave the following empty



https://digitalfire.com, All Rights Reserved
Privacy Policy