50-250C | 80C-250C | 120C | 150C | 180C | 185C | 200C | 200C-1000C | 200C-450C | 210C-280C | 250C-370C | 260C | 290C | 300C | 300C-330C | 370-950C | 400C | 425C-650C | 480C-600C | 500C-600C | 512C | 535C | 540C-600C | 650C-900C | 700F | 750C-1000C | 750-850 | 800C-1100C | 850-950 | 850C+ | 850C | 900C | 900-1000 | 990C | 1025-1325 | 1025C+ | 1050C | 1082C | 1100C+ | 1100C | 1300C | 1325C | 1330C | 1360C | | 1400F | 1418C-1428C | 1420C | 1500F | 1550C | 1565C | 1600F-1650F | 1650F | 1785C | 1800F | 1950F-2050F | 1990C | 2300C | 2320C | 2750F

1400F

Gerstley Borate stops gassing

Related Information

LOI is not important? Think again!

A chart showing weight-loss vs firing temperature for some common ceramic materials

This chart compares the decompositional gassing behavior of six materials as they are heated through the range 500-1700F. These materials are common in ceramic glazes, it is amazing that some can lose 40%, or even 50%, of their weight on firing. For example, 100 grams of calcium carbonate will generate 45 grams of CO2! This chart is a reminder that some late gassers overlap early melters. That is a problem. The LOI (% weight loss) of these materials can affect your glazes (causing bubbles, blisters, pinholes, crawling). Notice talc: It is not finished gassing until 1650F, yet many glazes have already begun melting by then (especially fritted ones). Even Gerstley Borate, a raw material, is beginning to melt while talc is barely finished gassing. And, there are lots of others that also create gases as they decompose during glaze melting (e.g. clays, carbonates, dioxides).

By Tony Hansen


Tell Us How to Improve This Page

Or ask a question and we will alter this page to better answer it.

Email Address

Name

Subject

Message


Upload picture


Copyright 2008, 2015, 2017 https://digitalfire.com, All Rights Reserved