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Alberta Slip Rutile Blue Cone 6

Code: GA6-C
Modification Date: 2016-09-11 11:28:55
Member of Group: AS6

Plainsman Cone 6 Alberta Slip based glaze the fires bright blue but with zero cobalt.

MaterialAmountPercent
Alberta Slip 1000F Roasted40.038.5%
Alberta Slip40.038.5%
Ferro Frit 313420.019.2%
Additions
Rutile4.03.8%
 104.00  

Firing Schedule

Rate (F)Temp (F)Hold (Min)Step
108220601
3502095152
1082195153
5001910304
15014005

Notes

This glaze creates a bright blue yet contains none of the world's most expensive common ceramic material, cobalt oxide. It has a great glossy surface and variegates a from medium steel blue where it is very thick to amber clear (or a brown if the body is dark) where it is too thin.

You will need to experiment to get it the right thickness in your circumstances. Try it on different clays and different thicknesses to find the best combination. It works best on stonewares. If it is melting too much or too little, increase or decrease the frit to compensate.

One possible caution: This glaze relies on the rutile variegation effect. Rutile can vary in chemistry over time and from place to place, so test this first before using and test it again when you get new supplies of rutile.

THE FLOW COLORATION REQUIRES SLOWER COOLING. This can happen naturally if you fire packed loads or have a well insulated kiln, but it is generally best to program the cool (use the Slow Cool schedule link to learn more, it drops the temperature, then holds, then slows the cooling to about 1400F). You can also add 0.25% cobalt oxide to restore the color if you want to do a faster cool (to prevent transparent glazes clouding, for example)! If the blue is working, but less than you want, then add a little less cobalt.

If the glaze shrinks and cracks too much on drying, then increase the calcine Alberta Slip and reduce the raw Alberta Slip. If it is too powdery on drying, increase the raw against the calcine.

There is also a Ravenscrag Slip version of this glaze, it employs iron, cobalt and rutile (like the original David Shaner recipe).

Out Bound Links

In Bound Links

XML to Paste Into Insight

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<recipes version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8">
<recipe name="Alberta Slip Rutile Blue Cone 6" keywords="Plainsman Cone 6 Alberta Slip based glaze the fires bright blue but with zero cobalt." id="31" date="2016-09-11" codenum="GA6-C">
<recipelines>
<recipeline material="Alberta Slip 1000F Roasted" amount="40.000" unitabbr="g" conversion="0.0010" added="0"/>
<recipeline material="Alberta Slip" amount="40.000" unitabbr="g" conversion="0.0010" added="0"/>
<recipeline material="Ferro Frit 3134" amount="20.000" unitabbr="g" conversion="0.0010" added="0"/>
<recipeline material="Rutile" amount="4.000" unitabbr="g" conversion="0.0010" added="1"/>
<url url="https://digitalfire.com/4sight/recipes/alberta_slip_rutile_blue_cone_6_31.html" descrip="Recipe page at digitalfire.com"/>
</recipelines>
<urls/>
</recipe>
</recipes>


By Tony Hansen




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