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Alberta Slip Glossy Brown Cone 6

Code: GA6-D
Modification Date: 2015-10-30 18:56:30
Member of Group: AS6

Plainsman Cone 6 Alberta Slip based glaze. It can be found among others at http://albertaslip.com.

MaterialAmountPercent
Alberta Slip Calcined40.037.0%
Alberta Slip40.037.0%
Ferro Frit 313420.018.5%
Additions
Rutile4.03.7%
Tin Oxide4.03.7%
 108.00  

Notes

Works well on all types of bodies, very reliable.

Tin oxide can stop the rutile variegation effect dead in its tracks!

Tin oxide can stop the rutile variegation effect dead in its tracks!

This is Alberta Slip (GA6C) on the left. Added frit is melting the Alberta Slip clay to it flows well at cone 6 and added rutile is creating the blue variegated effect (in the absence of expensive cobalt). However GA6D (right) is the same glaze with added Tin Oxide. The tin completely immobilizes the rutile blue effect, it brings out the color of the iron (from the rutile and the body).

Tin oxide can stop the rutile variegation effect dead in its tracks!

GA6-D brown Alberta Slip glaze at cone 5R.

Variegating effect of sprayed-on layer of 100% titanium dioxide

Variegating effect of sprayed-on layer of 100% titanium dioxide

The referred to surface is the outside of this large bowl. The base glaze (inside and out) is GA6-D Alberta Slip glaze fired at cone 6 on a buff stoneware. The thinness of the rutile needs to be controlled carefully, the only practical method to apply it is by spraying. The dramatical effect is a real testament to the variegating power of TiO2. An advantage of this technique is the source: Titanium dioxide instead of sourcing TiO2 from the often troublesome rutile.

Variegating effect of sprayed-on layer of 100% titanium dioxide

Speckled GA6-D glaze at cone 6.

Calcining Alberta Slip

Calcining Alberta Slip

Calcined Alberta Slip (right) and raw powder (left). These are just 5 inch cast bowls, I fire them to cone 020 and hold it for 30 minutes. Why calcine? Because for glazes having 50% or more Alberta Slip, cracking on drying can occur, especially if it is applied thick (Alberta Slip is a clay, it shrinks). I mix 50:50 raw:calcine for use in recipes. However, Alberta Slip has an LOI of 9%, so I need to use 9% less of the calcine powder (just multiply the amount by 0.91). Suppose, I needed 1000 grams: I would use 500 raw and 500*.91=455.

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By Tony Hansen

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