•The secret to cool bodies and glazes is a lot of testing.
•The secret to know what to test is material and chemistry knowledge.
•The secret to learning from testing is documentation.
•The place to test, do the chemistry and document is an account at https://insight-live.com
•The place to get the knowledge is https://digitalfire.com

Sign-up at https://insight-live.com today.

Mineral: Ball Clay

Notes

Ball clay is the most common type of secondary clay. They are much more plastic than kaolin because the particle size is much smaller. Ball clays are available with a wide range of plasticities (a product of varying particle sizes). They have higher iron content than kaolins so bodies made from them are not as white. Raw ball clays tend to be grey in color since they commonly contain some lignite. Ball clays are fairly refractory.

Carbon burnout in a ball clay

Carbon burnout in a ball clay

A broken test bar of ball clay fired to cone 10 reduction. Notice the black carbon core. Ball clays commonly contain carbon, many have a noticeable grey color in the raw state because of this. Notice it has not burned out despite the fact that the clay itself is still fairly porous, the firing was slow and the temperature reached was high. Ball clay typically does not comprise more than 30% of a body recipe so its opportunity to burn away is sufficient. However some specialized bodies have a much higher percentage.

OM4 Ball clay fired from cone 10R (top), 10 down to 4 (downward)

OM4 Ball clay fired from cone 10R (top), 10 down to 4 (downward)

Ball clays are normally refractory, none of these are vitrified to any extent. The cone 10R bar is yellow because it is stained by the soluble salts present in the material.

OM4 Ball clay fired from cone 10R (top), 10 down to 4 (downward)

Ball clay and kaolin test bars side-by-side fired from cone 9-11 oxidation and 10 reduction.

High drying shrinkage of Plainsman A2 ball clay (DFAC disk)

High drying shrinkage of Plainsman A2 ball clay (DFAC disk)

This test shows the incredible dry shrinkage that a ball clay can have. Obviously if too much of this is employed in a body recipe one can expect it to put stress on the body during drying. Nevertheless, the dry strength of this material far exceeds that of a kaolin and when used judiciously it can really improve the working properties of a body giving the added benefit of extra dry strength.

The white one feels smoother, but it is actually far coarser. Why?

The white one feels smoother, but it is actually far coarser. Why?

Large particle kaolin (left) and small-particle ball clay (right) DFAC drying disks demonstrate the dramatic difference in drying shrinkage and performance between these two extremes (these disks are dried with the center portion covered to set up a water content differential to add stresses that cause cracking). These materials both feel super-smooth, in fact, the white one feels smoother. But the ultimate particles tell the opposite story. The ball clay particles (grey clay) are far smaller (ten times or more). The particles of the kaolin (white) are flatter and lay down as such, that is why it feels smoother.

The white one feels smoother, but it is actually far coarser. Why?

Example of four different north American ball clays fired to cone 10R, cone 11 and cone 10.

Even heavy soluble salts may not have a significant affect on the glaze

Even heavy soluble salts may not have a significant affect on the glaze

This is a ball clay. They are known to produce this type of soluble salts when fired at high temperature reduction (the inner salt-free section is such because that part of the tile was covered during drying, so the soluble salts from there had to migrate to the outer exposed edge). If soluble salts fire to a glassy surface they can affect the overlying glaze. But in this case they are not and have a minimal effect.

Particle size drastically affects drying performance

Particle size drastically affects drying performance

These are DFAC drying performance tests of Plainsman A2 ball clay at 10 mesh (left) and ball milled (right). This test dries a flat disk that has the center section covered to delay its progress in comparison to the outer section (thus setting up stresses). Finer particle sizes greatly increase shrinkage and this increases the number of cracks and the cracking pattern of this specimen. Notice it has also increased the amount of soluble salts that have concentrated between the two zones, more is dissolving because of the increased particle surface area.

Out Bound Links

  • (Minerals - Related) Kaolinite

    The most fundamental clay mineral. This mineral is found in nature in its purest form as kaolin. However it makes up at least part of all ceramic clays. The purest deposits are created as it is weathe...

In Bound Links

  • (Glossary) Secondary Clay

    Clays that have been transported by water from the site of their primary alteration and settled into layers. They are classified according to the geological period in which they were formed. Nature purifies these clay mechanically, removing gravel and sand, but contaminates them chemically or at the...


By Tony Hansen




Feedback, Suggestions

Your email address

Subject

Your Name

Message


Copyright 2003, 2008, 2015 https://digitalfire.com, All Rights Reserved