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National Standard 325 Bentonite

Wyoming Sodium Bentonite

OxideAnalysisFormula
CaO0.90%0.134
MgO2.50%0.517
K2O0.30%0.027
Na2O2.40%0.323
TiO20.15%0.016
Al2O320.90%1.708
SiO265.00%9.015
Fe2O31.80%0.094
LOI5.00
Oxide Weight783.10
Formula Weight824.32
If this formula is not unified correctly please contact us.
P325 - % Passing 325 Mesh Wet 95%

A finely ground Wyoming bentonite used in industrial coatings, paper, ceramics and household products.

They quote trace amounts in the chemistry for Cr (0.02), Mn (0.06) and V (0.03).
They quote a quartz content between 2 and 5%, illite 2-4%, smectite 85-91%.

We have quoted one of two analyses received from them (this one is closer to toalling 100).
We have estimated the LOI since that was not provided.


National Standard Bentonite fired to 1650F in a small crucible

National Standard Bentonite fired to 1650F in a small crucible

The powder was simply put into it and fired. Sintering is just beginning.

Two bentonites that should not look this similar

Two bentonites that should not look this similar

The powders of HPM-20 bentonite (left) and National Standard 325 bentonite (right) fired to cone 6. Both have sintered into a solid mass. The HPM-20 is much more expensive because of the extra grinding done to make it micro-fine (for non-ceramic uses). However, its data sheet shows an Fe2O3 content double that of the National Standard material. That means the latter should be firing to alot lighter color. But they seem very similar.

HPM-20 and National Standard bentonites fired to cone 9

HPM-20 and National Standard bentonites fired to cone 9

The powders of HPM-20 bentonite (left) and National Standard 325 bentonite (right) were fired in crucibles to cone 9. Both have sintered into a solid mass and have shrunk as a unit away from the walls of the crucible. Considerable shrinkage has occurred since cone 6.

Out Bound Links


By Tony Hansen

XML for Import into INSIGHT

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <material name="National Standard 325 Bentonite" descrip="Wyoming Sodium Bentonite" searchkey="" loi="0.00" casnumber=""> <oxides> <oxide symbol="CaO" name="Calcium Oxide, Calcia" status="" percent="0.900" tolerance=""/> <oxide symbol="MgO" name="Magnesium Oxide, Magnesia" status="" percent="2.500" tolerance=""/> <oxide symbol="K2O" name="Potassium Oxide" status="" percent="0.300" tolerance=""/> <oxide symbol="Na2O" name="Sodium Oxide, Soda" status="" percent="2.400" tolerance=""/> <oxide symbol="TiO2" name="Titanium Dioxide, Titania" status="" percent="0.150" tolerance=""/> <oxide symbol="Al2O3" name="Aluminum Oxide, Alumina" status="" percent="20.900" tolerance=""/> <oxide symbol="SiO2" name="Silicon Dioxide, Silica" status="" percent="65.000" tolerance=""/> <oxide symbol="Fe2O3" name="Iron Oxide, Ferric Oxide" status="" percent="1.800" tolerance=""/> </oxides> <volatiles> <volatile symbol="LOI" name="Loss on Ignition" percent="5.000" tolerance=""/> </volatiles> </material>


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