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Borosilicate


A silicate is an SiO2-centric solid (crystalline or glass). A borosilicate simply is a silicate with boron. The term 'borosilicate' is synonymous with medium and low fire glazes because boron is not employed at high temperatures (CaO, Na2O, MgO, etc flux silica and bond with it to form crystalline or glass solids on cooling). The term 'borosilicate' almost always refers to a frit in ceramics. Such frits may have 5% B2O3 or 50%, but they always have plenty of SiO2 so the two can combine, and with other oxides in the melt, form silicates. Since boron is the melter that makes the glaze or glass possible, terminology referring to the chemistry normally mentions it.

Out Bound Links

  • (URLs) Silicate at Wikipedia

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silicate

  • (Glossary) Medium Temperature Glaze

    In functional ceramics this term generally refers to glazes that mature from cone 4 to 7. At these temperatures it is difficult to compound glazes that will melt well without the need for powerful melters like zinc and boron. Thus a medium temperature glaze contains mostly the same kinds of ingredie...

  • (Glossary) Borate

    The term 'boron' refers to the oxide B2O3. 'Borate materials' thus contain B2O3, they source it to glass-building during melting in the kiln. Boron is actually the potter's friend (because of his electronic-controller-equipped kiln) while as the same time it can be a scourge in industry (because the...

  • (Glossary) High Temperature Glaze

    In functional ceramics this term generally refers to glazes that mature at cone 8 and higher. At these temperatures natural minerals like feldspar, calcium carbonate, etc can be compounded to create glazes that will melt well without the need for powerful (and troublesome fluxes) like zinc oxide, bo...

  • (Glossary) Frit

    A ceramic glass that has been premixed from raw powdered minerals and then melted, cooled by quenching in water, and ground into a fine powder (search youtube for interesting videos). Huge quantities and varieties of frits are manufactured for the ceramic industry every year (especially for tile) by...


By Tony Hansen




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