Javascript must be enabled in the security or content
settings of your browser for this site to work properly

To learn more about cookies search for HTTP cookie at wikipedia.com





Click here for information about DIGITALFIRE Corporation
Home | Support | Education 
About | Privacy | Search | Reference Database | Log in 

Conquer the Glaze Dragon With Digitalfire INSIGHT Glaze Chemistry Software

Install it on your PC

Focused on ceramic glaze chemistry calculations.

Download: Windows (2014-8d), OSX (2014-8d), Linux (2014-8d)


Test, Document, Learn, Repeat in your account at insight-live.com

Use it online. The next step.

Nothing to download or install. Revolutionary!


Tony Hansen's Thousand-Post TimeLine

I am the creator of Digitalfire Insight, Digitalfire.com and Insight-live.com. ... more

   All

What would happen if you made a body from 50:50 kaolin:ball clay?

It would craze glazes! This is fired at cone 6 and the crazing was like this out of the kiln. This is about as bad as I have ever seen. One might think that there is adequate quartz in this high of a percentage of ball clay to at least minimize crazing, but no so. This demonstrates the need for ... more

Friday 4th September 2015

The difference: Firing schedule!

These are fired to cone 03. The one on the right was fired from 1850F to 1950F at 100F/hr, then soaked 15 minutes and shut off. The problem is surface tension. Like soapy water, when this glaze reaches cone 03 the melt is quite fluid. Since there is decomposition happening within the body, gases ... more

Friday 4th September 2015

Terra cotta and a surprising thing about thermal shock

This terra cotta cup is glazed with G2931G clear glaze (Ulexite based) and fired at cone 03. It survives 25 seconds under direct flame against the sidewall before a crack occurs. Typical porcelains and stonewares would survive 5-10 seconds! This is a key advantage of earthenware. Sudden changes ... more

Thursday 3rd September 2015

Test bars of different terra cotta clays fired at different temperatures

Bottom: cone 2, next up: cone 02, next up: cone 04. You can see varying levels of maturity (or vitrification). It is common for terra cotta clays to fire like this, from a light red at cone 06 and then darkening progressively as the temperature rises. Typical materials develop deep red color around ... more

Wednesday 2nd September 2015

Cone 2: Where we see the real difference between terra cottas and white bodies

The terra cotta (red earthenware) body on the upper left is melting, it is way past zero porosity, past vitrified. The red one below it and third one down on the right have 1% porosity (like a stoneware), they are still fairly stable at cone 2. The two at the bottom have higher iron contents and are ... more

Wednesday 2nd September 2015

An example of how cobalt can precipitate in a fluid melt glaze at cone 6

This glaze has a significant amount of cobalt carbonate and during cooling the excess is precipitating out into pink crystals during cooling in the kiln. This effect is unwanted because in this case since it produces an unpleasant surface and color (the photo does not clearly show how pink it is). ... more

Wednesday 2nd September 2015

Looking for a non-crazed non-cutlery marking cone 10R dolomite matte?

This is G2571A cone 10R dolomite matte on an ironware body made from native North Carolina clays. Few glazes have the pleasant silky feel that this has yet are still functional. The feldspar content in the body has been tuned to establish a compromise between the warmer color low percentages have ... more

Wednesday 2nd September 2015

Two great dolomite matte cone 10R recipes on iron stoneware

GR10-J Ravenscrag silky matte (right) and G2571A matte (left) on a dark burning iron speckled stoneware at cone 10R. Surfaces have identical feel (the chemistries are very close). The former fires a little darker color because of the iron contributed by the Ravenscrag Slip.

Wednesday 2nd September 2015

A refined-material cone 10R dolomite matte (left) vs. one made using Ravenscrag Slip

GR10-J Ravenscrag silky matte (right) and G2571A matte (left) on a buff stoneware at cone 10R. Surfaces feel identical, the slightly darker color is due to iron content in the Ravenscrag. The former was formulated to mimic the latter using as much Ravenscrag Slip as possible yet still maintain the same chemistry.

Wednesday 2nd September 2015

How to turn a dolomite matte white glaze into a bamboo matte

Make cone 10R bamboo colors using the GR10-J Ravenscrag silky matte base recipe (right) and adding 1% iron (left), (0.5% centre). These samples are porcelain. This iron addition also works using the G2571A matte base recipe.

Wednesday 2nd September 2015


These posts are actually pictures referenced on pages in The Digitalfire Reference Database, thousands of pages of explaining things you need to know to formulate, adjust and troubleshoot traditional ceramic bodies and glazes. It is organized as: Oxides, minerals, materials, recipes, articles, glossary, hazards, library, MDTs for INSIGHT, pictures, properties, firing schedules, significant temperatures, tests and troubleshooting. Level 2 desktop INSIGHT and Insight-Live both interact with it.

Sign In or Register

Is your glaze problem related to it's chemistry? Ask Us!

Email address

Subject

Name

Message

Enter this code

Prove you are human

What people say about digitalfire.com

  • Almost anything I have to say I learned from you. Keep up the great work.
  • We have been aware of your company and website for many years and see it as a model in its approach to educating makers about the processes involved in making/drying/firing. You teach them to take responsibility for their work process rather than blaming the product.
Click here to see all 187

DigitalFire Logo

1 - 530 Allowance Ave SE, Medicine Hat, Alberta Canada T1A 3E3
FAX: (403) 527-7508
Privacy Policy