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Conquer the Glaze Dragon With Digitalfire INSIGHT Glaze Chemistry Software

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Tony Hansen's Thousand-Post TimeLine

I am the creator of Digitalfire Insight, Digitalfire.com and Insight-live.com. ... more

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Sponging and fired specks

The left half of this cone 6 buff burning native-clay stoneware (Plainsman M340) was sponged at the dry stage. That exposed iron-bearing particles that are normally pushed under the surface. The result is a denser population of fired specks. While not usually a problem on flat surfaces, this can be an issue when rims of functional pieces are sponged and glazes stretch thin there during firing.

Friday 31st July 2015

A cure for long-time low and medium fire Gerstley Borate sufferers!

These are various different terra cotta clays fired to cone 04 (also a low fire white-buff fritted stoneware) with a recipe I formulated to source the same chemistry as the popular Worthington clear, but sourcing the B2O3 from Ulexite and a frit instead of Gerstley Borate (G2931B). All pieces are ... more

Friday 31st July 2015

Glaze bubbles behaving badly!

These melted-down-ten-gram balls of glaze demonstrate the different ways in which tiny bubbles disrupt transparent glazes. These bubbles are generated during firing as particles in the body and glaze decompose. This test is a good way to compare bubble sizes and populations, they are a product of ... more

Friday 31st July 2015

Why is this crystalline glaze not crazed? Even in the pool at the bottom?

Because this is Plainsman Crystal Ice, it contains 40% silica (quartz). It also does not vitrify, so as much of the quartz remains undissolved as possible. This produces a body with a much high thermal expansion so it can put more of a squeeze on the high-expansion glazes used in the crystal glazing process (it is very common for such glazes to be crazed, it is accepted as part of the process).

Friday 31st July 2015

Let me count the reasons this glossy white cone 6 glaze is pinholing

First, the layer is very thick. Second, the body was only bisque fired to cone 06 and it is a raw brown burning stoneware with lots of coarser particles that generate gases as they are heated. Third, the glaze contains zircopax, it stiffens the melt and makes it less able to heal disruptions in the ... more

Friday 31st July 2015

Making my own home-made fired speckle for cone 6

I control the recipe and temperature I use to make it and now I need to control the particle size. I have already smashed it up (using a special flat hammer we have) and am now sizing it. That involves getting what I can through the screen and then going at the larger sized particles with a hammer ... more

Friday 31st July 2015

Making your own crucibles

I mixed a cone 6 porcelain body and a cone 6 clear glaze 50:50 and added 10% Mason 6666 black stain. The material was plastic enough to slurry, dewater and wedge like a clay, so I dried a slab and broke it up into small pieces. I then melted them at cone 6 in a zircopax crucible (I make these by ... more

Friday 31st July 2015

Does copper cause glazes to leach?

These are four cone 6 glazes of diverse chemistry. They have varying melt fluidities. They are soaked (half way up) in lemon juice over night. None show any evidence of surface changes. All contain 2% copper carbonate. If the copper was increased, especially to the point of going metallic or ... more

Friday 31st July 2015

Comparing the melt fluidity of four copper blue cone 6 glazes

The first glaze is a control, a standard non-fluid clear with copper. The other three are the short-listed ones in my project to find a good copper blue recipe starting recipe and fix its problems (which they all have). The flow testers at the back and the melt-down-balls in front of them contain ... more

Thursday 30th July 2015

Almost final recipe for cone 6 copper blue - G2806B

This is the winner of a five-way cone 6 copper blue glaze comparison that started with my dissatisfaction with Panama blue. The porcelain body (of this mug) is the new Plainsman P300. When I compared these glazes I did not just eyeball them on a tile. I compared the bases first (without the copper ... more

Thursday 30th July 2015


These posts are actually pictures referenced on pages in The Digitalfire Reference Database, thousands of pages of explaining things you need to know to formulate, adjust and troubleshoot traditional ceramic bodies and glazes. It is organized as: Oxides, minerals, materials, recipes, articles, glossary, hazards, library, MDTs for INSIGHT, pictures, properties, firing schedules, significant temperatures, tests and troubleshooting. Level 2 desktop INSIGHT and Insight-Live both interact with it.

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