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Copper Carbonate

Formula: CuCO3
Alternate Names: Synthetic Malachite, CuCO3

OxideAnalysisFormula
CuO64.40%1.000
CO235.62
Oxide Weight79.54
Formula Weight123.55
Enter the formula and formula weight directly into the Insight MDT dialog (since it records materials as formulas).
Enter the analysis into an Insight recipe and enter the LOI using Override Calculated LOI (in the Calc menu). It will calculate the formula.
DENS - Density (Specific Gravity) 3.70
MLPT - Melting Point (MP) 500C D
TGA - TGA See accompanying curve image

Conceptually, copper carbonate is CuCO3, however this form is not normally available in the market (copper carbonate basic is the article of commerce) so the powder should be viewed as a family of compounds.

This material is considered volatile during firing and thus can affect the color of other pieces in the firing. See Copper Carbonate Basic for more information.


Out Bound Links

In Bound Links


Pictures

Copper carbonate power.

Cobalt carbonate (top) and copper carbonate (bottom). Left is the raw powder plastic-formed into a sample (with 2% veegum). Right: fired to 1850F. The CuCO3 is quickly densifying over the past 100 degrees and should begin to melt soon. It is long past the fuming stage.

These are pure samples (with 2% binder added) of (top left to bottom right) strontium carbonate, nepheline syenite, cobalt carbonate, manganese dioxide, bentonite (in bowl), 6 Tile kaolin, New Zealand kaolin and copper carbonate. I am firing them at 50F increments from 1500F and weighing to calculate loss on ignition for each. I want to find out at what temperature they are gassing (and potentially bubble-disrupting the glaze they are in or under). Notice how the copper is fuming and spitting black specks on the shelf, this happens right around 1500F. These stains on the shelf darkened considerably when the kiln was fired higher.

And example of how copper carbonate fumes during firing. The white sample on the left was near the copper sample, at around 1500F the fumes discolored its facing edge. These are permanent, they do not fire out but get darker with increasing temperature (this is 2000F). The kiln shelf was also discolored outward about half an inch from the copper specimen.


By Tony Hansen

XML for Import into INSIGHT

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <material name="Copper Carbonate" descrip="" searchkey="Synthetic Malachite, CuCO3" loi="0.00" casnumber="3444-14-2"> <oxides> <oxide symbol="CuO" name="Cupric Oxide" status="" percent="64.400" tolerance=""/> </oxides> <volatiles> <volatile symbol="CO2" name="Carbon Dioxide" percent="35.620" tolerance=""/> </volatiles> </material>


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